Reducing the Risks of Being the Next ERP Failure

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ERP-Failure

ERP Failure- Failed ERP software system implementations and integrations happen frequently and the problems are legion. However, there are ways that organizations can avoid their own failures. In a recent Taft Technology Insights post, we discussed how to avoid a failure if restarting a deferred integration during COVID-19.

We are frequently retained by companies whose projects are in such disarray that vendor or integrator relationships are beyond repair and disputes are heading to court. We spend a considerable amount of time reviewing contracts, emails, reports, and memos, and speaking with key figures as part of negotiating a settlement or preparing a court argument. Over the years, we have seen patterns emerge where the reasons behind the failure of the ERP software system could have been uncovered and corrected long before reaching the point of no return.

While not all ERP failures can be avoided, many can be salvaged if the user takes certain steps – often beginning when the project is first being considered.

Mitigating Risks of ERP Failure

Along with working with an independent, technology-agnostic consultant from the outset, a user can do several things internally to mitigate risks or salvage an implementation that is in trouble.

The Boy Scouts’ “be prepared” motto is applicable for ERP projects. The ERP contract should require weekly or monthly project status reports, and include a senior-level contact at the integrator who isn’t part of the project team to review both progress and challenges.

Beyond this, the user should consider having a “go team” on standby to swoop in at the first sign of a problem. The team would conduct an assessment to identify the likely root cause of the issue. Members of the group must be familiar with ERP and the business goal of the new installation or upgrade and might include people from the user’s IT department, plus finance and operations.

Often, the root cause of the problem can be discovered by the go team and fixed by the integrator.

If the first intervention is unsuccessful, it may be time to bring in a consultant to review the project and determine steps to right side the implementation. When an ERP project derails because the actual integration plan bore little resemblance to the project plan, it is sometimes the result of senior management’s inattention. Whatever the cause, it is critical to determine if the project can be saved. Efforts spent on righting the project will cost less and have less impact on the business than starting over with a new software product or litigating the dispute in court.

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Article Credit: Lexology

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